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How to Grow

Amaranth (amaranthus hypochondriacus)

Sow seeds directly into your garden beds in the springtime once heavy frosts have passed. OR plant each seed into single celled flats or trays 4 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Plant 6-10 inches apart for full head harvests, or 2-5 for repeat cuttings of baby leaf greens. Amaranth prefers full sun and well drained soil. 

Beans (phaseolus vulgaris, lunatus, coccineus, and glycine max)

Treat common (vulgaris), lima's (lunatus), runners (coccineus) and soybeans (glycine max) all the same. (You can also include Asparagus peas in this category!) Plant each seed 3 inches apart (and about 1 inch deep) from one another in  a row or a block. Wait until frosts have passed in your region and make sure that your soil is warm to the touch before you plant your bean seeds. Always plant your beans directly into the soil, they do NOT like to be transplanted or have their roots disturbed once they are established. Beans prefer full sun and loose soil. (Hand or machine till your planting area before seeding.)

Calendula (officinalis arvensis) 

Plant seeds directly into your soil (about a half inch deep)once it is warm to the touch and any risk of frost has passed. Water regularly until established, at this point they will do great in drought like conditions. Prefers full sun. Grows well in poor soil.

Cucurbits (cucumber-cucumis sativus, melon- cucumis melo, watermelon- citrullus lanatus, squash and pumpkins c.pepo, c.maxima, c.moschata, c.mixta)

Plant seeds directly into your garden soil about 2-3 feet apart (more or less distance depending on size of fruits and vines) once any risk of frost has passed and the soil is warm. OR Plant each seed into single pots 2-3 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Cucurbit seeds prefer a temperature of around 20 celsius to germinate and usually takes just a few days to do so. Transplant into your garden beds once any risk of frost has passed in your area. Cucurbit plants prefer full sun and would love some composted manure! (*be careful planting, their roots do NOT like to be disturbed!)

Dill (anethum graveolens)

Plant each seed 3 inches apart (and about 1/4 inch deep) from one another in  a row or a block. Wait until frosts have passed in your region and make sure that your soil is warm to the touch before you plant your seeds. 

Echinacea (echinacea purpurea)

Plant seeds directly into your garden soil in the late fall or early winter. You can also start your seeds indoors about 6 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Cold Stratification will benefit the germination of the seeds (you can fake this by putting them in the freezer for a few weeks before planting.) Once established, Echinacea can tolerate pretty extreme drought and still be quite productive.

Greens (specifically brassica types- golden frills-b.juncea, kales & collards- b.napus b.oleracea, b.rapa)

Sow seeds directly into your garden beds in the springtime once heavy frosts have passed. OR plant each seed into single celled flats or trays 3 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Plant 6-8 inches apart for full head harvests, or 3-5 for repeat cuttings of baby leaves. Brassica greens are hardy and will grow almost anywhere. 

Ground Cherries  (physalis)

Plant each seed into single celled flats or single pots 4-6 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Ground Cherries like lots of heat to germinate, keep a temperature of at least 25 celsius until they have formed their second set of leaves, at this point they can grow at 20 celsius comfortably. Transplant into your garden beds once any risk of frost has passed in your area. Plants will sprawl, I recommend trellising these, or leaving ample space. Prefers full sun to partial shade. 

Lettuce (lactuca sativa)

Sow seeds directly into your garden beds in the springtime once heavy frosts have passed. OR plant each seed into single celled flats or trays 3 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Plant 8-12 inches apart for full head harvests, or 4-6 for repeat cuttings of baby leaf lettuce. Lettuce prefers half to full sun and well drained, hand (or machine) tilled soil and lots of water. Foliar feedings, such as kelp extract will benefit.

Moonwort (lunaria biennis)

Plant seeds directly into your garden soil  1/4 inch deep in the spring or fall. OR plant the seeds into single celled flats or single pots 6-8 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Plant outdoors once heavy frosts have passed at about 8-12 inches apart. Prefers partial shade and well drained soil. 

Peas (pisum sativum)

Plant each seed 3 inches apart (and about 1/2 inch deep) from one another in  a row or a block. Wait until frosts have passed in your region and make sure that your soil is warm to the touch before you plant your pea seeds. Always plant your peas directly into the soil, they do NOT like to be transplanted or have their roots disturbed once they are established. Peas prefer full sun and loose soil. (Hand or machine till your planting area before seeding.)

Peppers (capsicum annuum)

Plant each seed into single celled flats or single pots 6-8 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Peppers seeds prefer a temperature of at least 22 celsius to germinate and sometimes take a couple of weeks to do so. Because they are in pots or trays for longer than the average seedling, an organic fertilizer three weeks in will give them a well needed nutrient boost. Transplant into your garden beds once any risk of frost has passed in your area. Pepper plants prefer full sun and would love some composted manure!

Poppies (Papaver Nudicaule)

Plant your poppy seeds directly into the soil once you have a consistent temperature of 21 celsius during the daytime. Plant your seeds just below the soils surface as a bit of light will motivate them to germinate. Well drained soil is a priority, but poppies will grow in even the poorest, driest soils. Poppies prefer full sun to partial shade. You can start them indoors as well by surface sowing your seeds and keeping moist. 

Purslane (portulaca oleracea)

Sow seeds directly into your garden beds in the springtime once heavy frosts have passed and the soil is warm. Purslane prefers full sun and well drained soil with lots of water.

Strawberry Spinach (chenopodium capitatum)

Plant seeds directly into your garden soil in the early summertime. (Sprinkle them lightly into the soil and then lightly sprinkle soil over top of the seeds, you can press them lightly into the soil with your hands. If you have trouble planting because the seeds are sooo tiny-you can thin them out once they have their second set of leaves. Choose a sunny spot to plant. OR Start seeds indoors in single celled flats (or in clusters) three to four weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Strawberry Spinach likes it to be fairly warm for vigorous germination…and will still have fairly erratic germination, this is typical. (around 21 celsius)

Summer Savoury (satureja hortensis)

Start your seeds indoors 4-6 weeks before transplanting outdoors. Sow seeds just on top of the soils surface and just barely cover them with soil, light will help them germinate. Start them with a growlight, or in a sunny windowsill. Wait until any risk of frost has passed in your area and soil is warm to the touch before transplanting outdoors.

Tomatillos (physalis philadelphica)

Plant each seed into single celled flats or single pots 4-6 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Tomatillos like lots of heat to germinate, keep a temperature of at least 25 celsius until they have formed their second set of leaves, at this point they can grow at 20 celsius comfortably. Transplant into your garden beds once any risk of frost has passed in your area. Plants will sprawl, and will grow to four feet high under ideal conditions. I recommend trellising these. Prefers full sun. 

 

Tomatoes (solanum lycopersicum)   

Plant each seed into single celled flats or single pots 4-6 weeks before you intend to plant them outdoors. Plant the seeds about 1/4 inch deep into a compost enriched soil mix. Tomato seeds prefer a temperature of at least 21-22 celsius to do so. (you can lower the temperature a bit after they have sprouted up)Tomatoes will benefit from an organic fertilizer (either mix compost in with your potting soil or add fertilizer) after about 3 weeks of growth, or you can wait until you transplant them into your garden bed-dig a deep hole, fill it halfway with compost, and then transplant your seedling into this hole. Wait to transplant until any risk of frost has passed in your area and the soil is warm. You can bury the stem up to its biggest leaves to encourage super strong root growth. (first clip the small leaves off before burying) More roots=More fruits!

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